Bye, Bye, Red Eye: Photography Tips To Develop Your Skills

Bye, Bye, Red Eye: Photography Tips To Develop Your Skills

Are you going into photography for the first time? You probably don’t even know where to start. It’s no secret that starting to take photos for the first time can be a bit overwhelming. Below are some tips that can help to make learning to properly take photos a bit easier.

Select a subject and focus on it. Point your camera towards this subject or object and use the auto focus feature if necessary. If you do not do this, your picture will look blurry. Play with conventions and select an unusual point of focus if you want original pictures.

Make sure you support the camera from below and on the sides, while keeping your arms tucked tightly into the sides of your body. This keeps the camera steady and reduces the number of blurred shots you take. Placing your hands under your lens and camera will prevent your camera from being accidentally dropped.

A good photography tip is to know how to create a dynamic composition. You can do this easily by paying attention to how you crop things in the picture. If you show just a part of someone’s body, the photograph will feel more dynamic than if you were to simply show the whole person.

A common beginner’s mistake is to place one’s thumb on the lens while taking a photograph. This causes a blurry spot to appear in the corner of a photograph. You should make sure your lens is clean and that you are not obstructing it with your thumb before taking a picture.

Many digital cameras nowadays actually have a setting for red eye reduction. One of the worst things that can happen to a good picture is the subject will have red eye, ruining an otherwise perfect picture. If you have a setting, turn that setting on first, then snap your shot, and presto, no red eye!

Lighting is not only important for keeping your subject lit and visible, but the shadows in your shot are completely reliant on the lighting of the area. If you are using a larger light source, then you will have smaller shadows to work with. This can be good or bad depending on the subject or technique.

A good rule of thumb when it comes to choosing settings on your camera is to choose the higher quality settings that take up more space on your memory card. The lower settings will not allow for quality printing, especially if you want to enlarge them. When shooting at a high resolution, you can always lower it later for sending via email or displaying online.

In most situations, you need to make a choice between setting your exposure to favor the highlights of a picture or its shadows. If you can’t choose between highlights and shadows, take two shots. If you still can’t determine which shot is better, use photo-editing software to blend the two shots into a new composite photo. This composite photo may seem perfect to your eye.

Experiment with different speeds for your camera’s shutter. Do not be afraid of hurting your equipment. Speed it up and slow it down. See how the speed effects the final picture. Take a lot of practice shots, and get familiar with how your camera will react at different shutter speeds.

Get views of different angles of the subject or scene that you are shooting. Many amateurs will not take the time to move around the subject to find the best angle, if you do, you’ll find there are many different photos to be taken of one subject.

Do not trust the appearance of the photo on your camera’s LCD screen. Any picture that you take and look at on a two or three inch screen is going to look sharp. If you are taking a shot that you do not want to take the chance of messing up, zoom in and look closely at every pixel to make sure that it is as you want it to be.

As you have seen, photography is not anywhere near as scary as it may appear at first. Just think of all of the benefits it has and all of the expenses it can take care of since you are now good enough to take photos of special moments without using a professional.

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